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Re: The Greatest Danger Investors Face


@chang wrote:

Your story might sound good if it weren’t the 1,000th time you’re berating KMI buyers. I never owned it, I’m just sick of hearing you attack people for this, that and the other.

Just my observation.



@chang wrote:

Your story might sound good if it weren’t the 1,000th time you’re berating KMI buyers. I never owned it, I’m just sick of hearing you attack people for this, that and the other.

Just my observation.


Thank you for your support. Brantley has been on his KMI rant for 5 years. I sold KMI years ago and exited MLP sector in 2017 to focus on tech sector and QQQ. I don’t know why he continues to obsess over KMI other than he can’t think of anything else to discuss.

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Re: The Greatest Danger Investors Face

 

IMO, the greatest danger investors face, long term, is the country's sped-up move toward socialism, in the extreme sense, and the risk of wealth confiscation of various forms.  Such as nationalizing companies/industries; wealth taxes; IRA surtaxes; dollar caps on all forms of assets and their benefits; inability to go elsewhere with your wealth, etc.  You may simply be prohibited from owning anything exceeding a dollar limit.  Most recent example...elimination of "stretch IRA features."  Just one of many coming.  Remember, Social Security was once non-taxable income to recipients.

R48

 

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Re: The Greatest Danger Investors Face


@retiredat48 wrote:

 

IMO, the greatest danger investors face, long term, is the country's sped-up move toward socialism, in the extreme sense, and the risk of wealth confiscation of various forms.  Such as nationalizing companies/industries; wealth taxes; IRA surtaxes; dollar caps on all forms of assets and their benefits; inability to go elsewhere with your wealth, etc.  You may simply be prohibited from owning anything exceeding a dollar limit.  Most recent example...elimination of "stretch IRA features."  Just one of many coming.  Remember, Social Security was once non-taxable income to recipients.

R48

 


Why would congress raise taxes on the bottom 98% of taxpayers in a recession which will raise little revenue and reduce amount consumers will have to spend to grow the economy when the government can borrow unlimited $Ts from the federal reserve at an interest rate of 1.4%? 80% of the interest paid to the Federal reserve is returned to the treasury each year. Fed was recycling $90B+ a year to treasury during the Great Recession.  Last time congress raised taxes in a recession it increased unemployment and prolonged the recession until the US began to rearm for WW II.

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Re: The Greatest Danger Investors Face

bilperk, I agree that not all stock tips should be acted on, but there are others that if one does his/her DD may prove to be good investments; take SGEN, a company I purchased in January of 2007 for $6.99. I had information on that stock from some one in the know. What I see on these forums are individuals who don't trade individual stocks being overly concerned with those who hold stocks and reminding them that they could have done better if..........

Unless one ask for advise I don't see why one can't accept we are all individual investors and have our own way of thinking. These contentious discourses are beyond worthless. Most of us have been investing for years and hardly need to be told by M* members how we are erroring when they don't know our financial situation.

Life is too short to spend unnecessary time defending my reasoning for investing as I do. I've met my goals over the years and M* gave me hope long ago that I could be money ahead if I learned to manage my own accounts.  The only advise I more recently paid for was on a non IRA account when both my wife and I required some input from CFP  friend. I no longer use his help.

On to other things for the present.

Best to all.

Out

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Re: The Greatest Danger Investors Face


@chang wrote:

Your story might sound good if it weren’t the 1,000th time you’re berating KMI buyers. I never owned it, I’m just sick of hearing you attack people for this, that and the other.

Just my observation.


I'm pretty sure that Bentley has not posted about KMI a thousand times. My rough count is only 873 times.

His theory is that because some posters lost money on KMI, it's impossible to successfully pick stocks. 

That's like me deciding to have nothing to do with girls because the first girl I asked out said, "No".

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Re: The Greatest Danger Investors Face

Well, Learner, it ain't slow no mo..😉

Bob

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Re: The Greatest Danger Investors Face


@GLI2019 wrote:

Well, Learner, it ain't slow no mo..😉

Bob


In the future, I should be careful about what I wish for; I might get it.

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Re: The Greatest Danger Investors Face


@retiredat48 wrote:

 

IMO, the greatest danger investors face, long term, is the country's sped-up move toward socialism, in the extreme sense, and the risk of wealth confiscation of various forms.  Such as nationalizing companies/industries; wealth taxes; IRA surtaxes; dollar caps on all forms of assets and their benefits; inability to go elsewhere with your wealth, etc.  You may simply be prohibited from owning anything exceeding a dollar limit.  Most recent example...elimination of "stretch IRA features."  Just one of many coming.  Remember, Social Security was once non-taxable income to recipients.

R48

 


Socialism is form of government and so implicitly political.  If other decide to run with this it will quickly devolve into insults.

bilperk:  owned himself since 1946

 

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Re: The Greatest Danger Investors Face

I have yet to find a universal definition of market timing. Is buy/sell based on technical analysis market timing? If one finds a TA that succeeds in buying lower than sells and sells higher than buys 60% of the time, over the long run it does make sense. Expecting to always sell at the top and buy at the bottom is arguably unrealistic, but such an extreme example as top and bottom, isn't reason to completely discredit some form of timing. If market timing means trading based on emotion or guessing tops and bottoms, then I would guess on the average it would prove to be of little use.

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Re: The Greatest Danger Investors Face


@outandabout wrote:

bilperk, I agree that not all stock tips should be acted on, but there are others that if one does his/her DD may prove to be good investments; take SGEN, a company I purchased in January of 2007 for $6.99. I had information on that stock from some one in the know. What I see on these forums are individuals who don't trade individual stocks being overly concerned with those who hold stocks and reminding them that they could have done better if..........

Unless one ask for advise I don't see why one can't accept we are all individual investors and have our own way of thinking. These contentious discourses are beyond worthless. Most of us have been investing for years and hardly need to be told by M* members how we are erroring when they don't know our financial situation.

Life is too short to spend unnecessary time defending my reasoning for investing as I do. I've met my goals over the years and M* gave me hope long ago that I could be money ahead if I learned to manage my own accounts.  The only advise I more recently paid for was on a non IRA account when both my wife and I required some input from CFP  friend. I no longer use his help.

On to other things for the present.

Best to all.

Out


Hi Out,

Unless you are describing insider trading, "someone in the know" is what everyone uses for their stock tips.  The guy who sold his stock the day you bought may have had "someone in the know" who didn't know what your knower did know.  Everyone thinks they do DD, but my point is some tips pan out and some don't.  Did you ever get a tip that didn't work out.  I did.  My ML broker told me to buy IBM calls and that was when I quit speculating (much) :o}  Hope you are doing well and are safe.

 

 

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Re: The Greatest Danger Investors Face


@norbertc wrote:

@chang wrote:

Your story might sound good if it weren’t the 1,000th time you’re berating KMI buyers. I never owned it, I’m just sick of hearing you attack people for this, that and the other.

Just my observation.


I'm pretty sure that Bentley has not posted about KMI a thousand times. My rough count is only 873 times.

His theory is that because some posters lost money on KMI, it's impossible to successfully pick stocks. 

That's like me deciding to have nothing to do with girls because the first girl I asked out said, "No".


Ha!  But what if she had stolen your wallet and car, and framed you for murder?

 

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Re: The Greatest Danger Investors Face


@bilperk wrote:

@outandabout wrote:

bilperk, I agree that not all stock tips should be acted on, but there are others that if one does his/her DD may prove to be good investments; take SGEN, a company I purchased in January of 2007 for $6.99. I had information on that stock from some one in the know. What I see on these forums are individuals who don't trade individual stocks being overly concerned with those who hold stocks and reminding them that they could have done better if..........

Unless one ask for advise I don't see why one can't accept we are all individual investors and have our own way of thinking. These contentious discourses are beyond worthless. Most of us have been investing for years and hardly need to be told by M* members how we are erroring when they don't know our financial situation.

Life is too short to spend unnecessary time defending my reasoning for investing as I do. I've met my goals over the years and M* gave me hope long ago that I could be money ahead if I learned to manage my own accounts.  The only advise I more recently paid for was on a non IRA account when both my wife and I required some input from CFP  friend. I no longer use his help.

On to other things for the present.

Best to all.

Out


Hi Out,

Unless you are describing insider trading, "someone in the know" is what everyone uses for their stock tips.  The guy who sold his stock the day you bought may have had "someone in the know" who didn't know what your knower did know.  Everyone thinks they do DD, but my point is some tips pan out and some don't.  Did you ever get a tip that didn't work out.  I did.  My ML broker told me to buy IBM calls and that was when I quit speculating (much) :o}  Hope you are doing well and are safe.

 

 


 Cancer research has been one of my passions, thus my investments in ABBV, PFE, MRK, BMY, etc. 

Telecommunications is another interest, as I worked in that field for many years. Thus my interests in BCE, VZ, AT&T, CSCO, etc.

 

Got lots of tips that didn't work, but rarely put a lot of money into them. Chem-Nuclear Systems comes to mind of a company that paid me well for following up on what our company leader had to say.

Do remember one tip($50) I gave a beautiful waitress, but she walked out with my buddy rather than me.

Too many things going on medically but that's part of growing old, Bill. Hope you are well also.

Out

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Re: The Greatest Danger Investors Face


@Fishingrod wrote:

Chang, I also reported it.

I find them very rude, offensive, laser focused personal attacks. Even if names aren't mentioned which is rare, the intent of personal attack is still there.

I am also tired of the bottled response we always get,   -- 'Who, Me?'

Fishingrod


Do you just send a private message to @RyanM to report an offensive post or is there a specific process to it?  How do you identify a post?

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Re: The Greatest Danger Investors Face


@DocWu wrote:

Always good to re-read sound advice. Thanks to the OP.

In my IRA, I used to do silly things like throw a  thousand bucks at a speculative stock. Given that my IRA fluctates a thousand bucks easily on a dull trading day, I had fallen into that speculative trap where I thought "what can it hurt".  Well, it can hurt and I've stopped. Mutual funds going forward.


You are very lucky to have the capacity of self observation / evaluation.   Thanks for sharing.

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Re: The Greatest Danger Investors Face


@retiredat48 wrote:

 

IMO, the greatest danger investors face, long term, is the country's sped-up move toward socialism, in the extreme sense, and the risk of wealth confiscation of various forms.  Such as nationalizing companies/industries; wealth taxes; IRA surtaxes; dollar caps on all forms of assets and their benefits; inability to go elsewhere with your wealth, etc.  You may simply be prohibited from owning anything exceeding a dollar limit.  Most recent example...elimination of "stretch IRA features."  Just one of many coming.  Remember, Social Security was once non-taxable income to recipients.

R48

 


Do you have a solution or are you asking for a solution to your perceived problem?  Not sure if you are trying to help or asking for help.

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Re: The Greatest Danger Investors Face

Bentley says: "Timing the market. I get the appeal of market timing. Think about how much more money you could have if you could just sell before stocks crash and then buy them back at the bottom!
Volatile markets and economic crises tempt investors with the prospects of market timing even more than normal times as recency and hindsight bias shift into overdrive.
Alas, the only people who sell at the top and buy at the bottom are liars and people who are eventually going to make a big mistake at the worst possible time."

I hear this over and over and over and ....

Could we hear from those that stuck in there and it took years to recover back to even? IMHO selling when the investment or even the market is tanking is NOT "timing" but "cover you a.."! Losing 50% requires 100% gain to recover. Losing 25% requires 33% gain to recover. Etc. Etc, Etc,

If you are retired and as old as some of us here, IMHO we do not always have the time to just say "Oh, it'll recover." Tell me how well thjat worked in early 2000 and 2008-2009. How long did it take you to recover then?

Of course, if you just panic and sell and never get back in when the recovery starts, then you will do poorly. And should you get caught with a very rapid set back like early 2020, maybe one has to evaluate if holding is better than selling and making those large loses permanent. 

IMHO, if you don't want to put in the effort to develop a reasonable strategy, invest and manage your investments and, yes, even your mistakes, maybe you should buy a bunch of bonds, CD's, etc. and hold them to maturity and then take whatever they are paying when you have to reinvest.

GOOD LUCK!!!!

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Re: The Greatest Danger Investors Face

@Anitya There’s a option to “Report inappropriate content” on the drop down menu in the upper-right corner of each posting.

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Re: The Greatest Danger Investors Face


@GLI2019 wrote:

Kindly exempt  the OP--Learner--from any accusations of personal attack.

He posts for purposes of discussion, not personal attack--very characteristic of us TIAA folk.

I welcome Learner's post.  I have no use for the predictable personal attacks from other sources.

I don't know any day traders, but I certainly know (well) folks who have successfully invested in individual stocks and continue to do so in retirement.

I am mainly an annuitant, an indexer, with VWIAX thrown into the mix.  In other words, I am b o r I n g.  :-)

Bob


+1

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Re: The Greatest Danger Investors Face


@Learner wrote:

@GLI2019 wrote:

Well, Learner, it ain't slow no mo..😉

Bob


In the future, I should be careful about what I wish for; I might get it.


I thought you were joking in your OP.  These forums have become nothing but food fights!  BTW, thanks for the OP link.

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Re: The Greatest Danger Investors Face

@judger: That is a very good and fair question. 

People tend to conveniently forget (or cover) the failure very quickly.  When I asked even some of my best friends on what happened in 2008-2009.  They all claimed that they came out like a hero or at least unscathed. 

Human nature.:)

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