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Contributor ○○

I use synthetic oil in my Honda Accord so I do not have to change oil as often.  I  have been using oil filter from Honda but it seems it is made to last only with regular oil changes and not for the extended period.  If you use synthetic oil, any suggestions for an oil filter to go with synthetic oil would be appreciated. 

Thank you.

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Re: Synthetic Oil Filter for Cars

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I change my own oil and have used 100% synthetic since 2008. I change every 5000 miles because it's easy to remember using 5000 odometer increments and it gets my eyes under the hood. I use a filter designed for synthetics but am not loyal to a brand and have variously used Mobil 1 filter, Purolator PureOne, or Fram Ultra Synthetic.

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Re: Synthetic Oil Filter for Cars

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[My ability to quote from a post is no longer an option.]

In reply to Anitya's "Am curious why you are changing every 5K miles?" It so happens that my older Toyota recommends a change every 5000 miles or 6 months. With synthetic, I ignore the amount of time even if I were to drive only 5000 in two years. But the primary reason is because it's easier for me to track 5000 mile increments by the odometer. I last changed at 95,000 and will change again at 100,000. Newer cars tend to have more miles between changes such as 7,500 or 10,000. With such a car I would likely shift my oil changes to match (it's not hard to make a mental note to sync up with 7.5K or 10.0K frequency).

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Re: Synthetic Oil Filter for Cars

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There is no such thing as a multi-grade oil.  Oils are normally too thick to flow correctly when cold and can thin down too much when hot.  I remember running 10 wt oil in the winter and 30 wt oil in the summer when I first started driving.  30 wt oil takes too long to warm up and start flowing in the winter and 10 wt thins down too much and stops protecting the engine in the summer.  https://autosneed.com/oil-viscosity-and-weight/

The oil companies put in additives called viscosity index (VI) improvers to make modern multi-grade oils.  Heat can cause VI improvers to shear down and break apart causing the viscosity of the oil to change over time.  It starts becoming too thin.  Heat cycles can be unrelated to mileage, especially if you live in a city and are in heavy stop and go traffic.  That is why manufacturers put a time limit between oil changes  They do not know what environment the car will be driven in. https://www.machinerylubrication.com/Read/29144/oil-viscosity-drops

I live in the country.  I go by mileage not months but if I lived in a city I would definitely not go longer than the recommended time interval.

Because synthetic oil has fewer impurities than conventional oil it is both better for your engine and can go longer intervals between oil changes.  That and because its easy to remember is why I go 5000 miles.

P.S.  If your car is sitting in a garage and not in stop and go traffic then its a judgement call.  There are no heat cycles sitting in a garage with the motor off.  Unless the car is almost always in the garage I would never go 1.5 years between oil changes.

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Re: Synthetic Oil Filter for Cars

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@Anitya wrote:

Where do you buy the oil filter from?  Just want to make sure I buy from a place that would not cause me to have to return or have a misfit part causing leaks.

Does the oil filter come with the oil drain plug gasket or do you buy it separately?  How often do you change this?  

Do you have a recommendation for engine air filter as well, which I change by myself? 

Thanks for your help.


Sounds like you have a good mechanic. I've been fortunate in that regard as well. For oil filters, I have bought from Walmart and Amazon. In store, you can check the catalog to match the filter to car or go to the manufacturer website to do the same. Amazon will verify that car parts will fit your car if you input year, make, and model. I have recorded filter part number in the spreadsheet where I record car service.

The drain plug gasket is a separate purchase (not included with oil filter). I have bought from Toyota dealer but a couple of years ago I bought a 10-pack from an eBay seller for the price of 1 from Toyota. Came direct from China. Now I change the gasket every time but in the past, I have reused it up to 3 times and it never leaked. Not recommending that, just telling you my experience.

For air filter, I replaced the standard paper type with a washable reusable type some 3 years ago and clean every other oil change. But if I was purchasing a conventional air filter, I'd probably buy a name brand from aforementioned sources.

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Re: Synthetic Oil Filter for Cars

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The oil lasts but it still gets dirty.  Dirt is an abrasion.  I run nothing but full synthetic oil in my modified, supercharged 2000 Mustang.  Its not that expensive over conventional oil.  Still, I change oil every 5000 miles along with the oil filter.  I am running around 80% more horsepower than stock on the stock long block.  The motor currently has 215,000 miles and I been running at that power level for the last 150,000 miles.  It uses less than a quart of oil between oil changes and I don't baby the car at all.

Oil is cheap.  Full synthetic oil is great.  But, I still recommend changing out the dirty oil and oil filter.  I'm old enough to remember when we had to rebuild performance motors at 60,000 miles. Synthetic oil makes a big difference.  But, I still recommend changing the oil and oil filter.

P.S. Back then I was running a 426 street wedge and later a 440 magnum.  I'm currently running more power (and faster times) out of this little 280 than I did those old big blocks.  Centrifugal superchargers are great but sometimes I miss the low end torque.

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Re: Synthetic Oil Filter for Cars

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I use synthetic and OEM filter changed at manufacturer's recommended interval as long as the car is under warranty. After that, all bets are off.

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Re: Synthetic Oil Filter for Cars

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Fram offers filters designed for use with synthetic oil; 20,000 miles.

They offer a couple lesser grades of filters too.

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Re: Synthetic Oil Filter for Cars

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Mustang says that synthetic oil is not that much more expensive than conventional oil.  Which  I agree with, it is not.  But why do oil change outlets try and charge more than double for synthetic?  

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Re: Synthetic Oil Filter for Cars

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I change my own oil and have used 100% synthetic since 2008. I change every 5000 miles because it's easy to remember using 5000 odometer increments and it gets my eyes under the hood. I use a filter designed for synthetics but am not loyal to a brand and have variously used Mobil 1 filter, Purolator PureOne, or Fram Ultra Synthetic.

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Re: Synthetic Oil Filter for Cars

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We changed the oil in January second week. I may driven about 300 miles locally, and due to the pandemic, we did not drive until late July. We made a 950-mile trip to Chicago. Again, it is in the garage. Should I change the oil after 5000 miles or after 6 months?

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Re: Synthetic Oil Filter for Cars

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Wayoutwest,

My Honda manual says change oil every 7.5k miles or 6 months, whichever is early.  I drive less than 5K per year.  So, by going to full synthetic, i was changing oil every 1.5 yrs.  This time it has been two yrs, mostly because I was trying to avoid going to the shop.  The car has 125k miles.

Am curious why you are changing every 5K miles?

Thanks.  

A

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Re: Synthetic Oil Filter for Cars

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[My ability to quote from a post is no longer an option.]

In reply to Anitya's "Am curious why you are changing every 5K miles?" It so happens that my older Toyota recommends a change every 5000 miles or 6 months. With synthetic, I ignore the amount of time even if I were to drive only 5000 in two years. But the primary reason is because it's easier for me to track 5000 mile increments by the odometer. I last changed at 95,000 and will change again at 100,000. Newer cars tend to have more miles between changes such as 7,500 or 10,000. With such a car I would likely shift my oil changes to match (it's not hard to make a mental note to sync up with 7.5K or 10.0K frequency).

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Re: Synthetic Oil Filter for Cars

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Thanks, wayoutwest.  Additional info and Qs for you.

For the first time for oil change, I am taking the car to an ex-mechanic who no longer does car repairs, unless they are smog repairs, and performs smog tests from his existing repair shop.  He asked me to buy the parts and he will oblige with the service for fee.  He changed my car brakes and transmission oil and I am very pleased with his service.  I have been taking my car to him for smog test for many years but have not been able to find a good mechanic and so I asked him for help.

My car is from 2001 and it has an indicator that goes off when I reach the 7,500 miles from the last oil change - so, I do not have to remember. 

Where do you buy the oil filter from?  Just want to make sure I buy from a place that would not cause me to have to return or have a misfit part causing leaks.

Does the oil filter come with the oil drain plug gasket or do you buy it separately?  How often do you change this?  

Do you have a recommendation for engine air filter as well, which I change by myself? 

Thanks for your help.

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Re: Synthetic Oil Filter for Cars

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There is no such thing as a multi-grade oil.  Oils are normally too thick to flow correctly when cold and can thin down too much when hot.  I remember running 10 wt oil in the winter and 30 wt oil in the summer when I first started driving.  30 wt oil takes too long to warm up and start flowing in the winter and 10 wt thins down too much and stops protecting the engine in the summer.  https://autosneed.com/oil-viscosity-and-weight/

The oil companies put in additives called viscosity index (VI) improvers to make modern multi-grade oils.  Heat can cause VI improvers to shear down and break apart causing the viscosity of the oil to change over time.  It starts becoming too thin.  Heat cycles can be unrelated to mileage, especially if you live in a city and are in heavy stop and go traffic.  That is why manufacturers put a time limit between oil changes  They do not know what environment the car will be driven in. https://www.machinerylubrication.com/Read/29144/oil-viscosity-drops

I live in the country.  I go by mileage not months but if I lived in a city I would definitely not go longer than the recommended time interval.

Because synthetic oil has fewer impurities than conventional oil it is both better for your engine and can go longer intervals between oil changes.  That and because its easy to remember is why I go 5000 miles.

P.S.  If your car is sitting in a garage and not in stop and go traffic then its a judgement call.  There are no heat cycles sitting in a garage with the motor off.  Unless the car is almost always in the garage I would never go 1.5 years between oil changes.

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Re: Synthetic Oil Filter for Cars

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@Anitya wrote:

Where do you buy the oil filter from?  Just want to make sure I buy from a place that would not cause me to have to return or have a misfit part causing leaks.

Does the oil filter come with the oil drain plug gasket or do you buy it separately?  How often do you change this?  

Do you have a recommendation for engine air filter as well, which I change by myself? 

Thanks for your help.


Sounds like you have a good mechanic. I've been fortunate in that regard as well. For oil filters, I have bought from Walmart and Amazon. In store, you can check the catalog to match the filter to car or go to the manufacturer website to do the same. Amazon will verify that car parts will fit your car if you input year, make, and model. I have recorded filter part number in the spreadsheet where I record car service.

The drain plug gasket is a separate purchase (not included with oil filter). I have bought from Toyota dealer but a couple of years ago I bought a 10-pack from an eBay seller for the price of 1 from Toyota. Came direct from China. Now I change the gasket every time but in the past, I have reused it up to 3 times and it never leaked. Not recommending that, just telling you my experience.

For air filter, I replaced the standard paper type with a washable reusable type some 3 years ago and clean every other oil change. But if I was purchasing a conventional air filter, I'd probably buy a name brand from aforementioned sources.

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Re: Synthetic Oil Filter for Cars

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Thanks, wayoutwest, for the additional info.

Thanks everybody and Mustang for the replies.

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Re: Synthetic Oil Filter for Cars

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I do exactly what Consumer Reports says(link)

 Check your owner’s manual. It should be your car maintenance and operation bible. Don’t make assumptions on the interval based on past experiences or guidance from mechanics who profit from the work, because the timing has evolved over the years.

We have 2 vehicles 1) First vehicle owner’s manual says use regular oil and change every 7.5-10K or once annually  2) Second vehicle owner’s manual says use Synthetic oil and change every 10K or once annually

and this is exactly what I have done in the last 4 decades.  I disregard all mechanics about maintenance and follow the owner’s manual.

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Re: Synthetic Oil Filter for Cars

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Why would anyone change oil more often than the computer tells you to do? I am a car guy with classic cars but that is a different story when you have an original type motor, so I change based on time. I put few miles on per oil change?

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Re: Synthetic Oil Filter for Cars

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For engine air filters on Amazon for my car, only EcoGard and WIX have good cusotmer reviews.  Which is a better brand of these two? 

With the hope of putting less into the land fill, for washable-reusable engine air filters which is a good brand?

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Re: Synthetic Oil Filter for Cars

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Gary,

I have two Hondas.  In the newer one, the computer tells me when the oil is not efficient enough that i should change the oil. 

The older one specifies conventional oil and to change 7.5K miles or six months, whichever is earlier.  Change oil light comes on promptly at 7.5K miles, without regard to the lenght of time.  I suspect, the computer is not linked to time.  I thought Mustang had a point about stop and go traffic and heat cycles.  So, can you ignore the time specification in the manual?  I have been ignoring the time specification by using full synthetic oil because I am lazy and not because I thought through this issue.

A

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Re: Synthetic Oil Filter for Cars

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There is nothing wrong with following the owners manual.  My wife drives a stock 2003 Toyota Highlander.  We use full synthetic oil and change every 5000 miles.  It has 260,000 miles and uses less than a quart between oil changes.  We do the same with our 1998 Ford F150 and our 2002 Corvette convertible. They only have 100,000 miles each.  And, I don't change the oil in those vehicles.  We use a local quick lube place.

My 2000 Mustang is a completely different beast.  It is running far more horsepower than stock and I increased the oil capacity from 5 quarts to 6 quarts.  Why?  Because during prolonged high rpm operation a driver on a modded Mustang forum reported pumping the oil pan dry. 

How does that happen?  The higher the rpms the faster the oil pump operates.  The gravity drain back to the pan is mostly OK but upon a rare occasion (like prolonged high rpms) it isn't fast enough.  If the oil level falls below the pickup tube and the oil starved motor blows up (Rings and bearings become over heated and scarred and the gap widens.  Oil is a coolant as well as a lubricant.).  I've blown up motors.  There is nothing more sicking then hearing a rod knock.  Especially when it is in a rare 426 street wedge.

This can happen to stock motors too if the motor is driven low on oil.  That is why you should check your oil often and never drive it below the add mark.  You never want to pump the oil pan dry.

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Re: Synthetic Oil Filter for Cars

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Mustang,

Why do you say there is no such thing as a multi-grade oil?

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Re: Synthetic Oil Filter for Cars

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An oil's viscosity (the ability for oil to flow) at a specific temperature is given and the oil becomes thinner as the temperature is increased and this creates problems for motors designed to operate in a variety of temperatures.  Oil that becomes too thin causes increased wear of the bearings and rings.  Oil that is too thick takes a long time to start flowing and increases the load on the motor.

At one time there was only single grade oils.  The oil's grade depends on its viscosity index.  10 grade oils are thinner than 30 or 40 grade oils and flow better in a cold engine but they thin down too much when the motor gets hot.  That is why we used to run 10 grade oil in the winter and 30 grade oil in the summer.  https://autosneed.com/oil-viscosity-and-weight/

In the old days I sometimes waited too long to change from summer 30 grade oil to winter 10 grade oil.  On cold mornings the starter had great difficulty turning over the motor because of the increased load and it would run crappy until the engine temperature warmed up.  If the cold weather also drained the battery you could forget starting the car.

Multi-grade oils overcame this problem providing a lot better protection.  But oil doesn't come out of the ground multi-grade.  It has to be created by adding a VI (viscosity index) improver.  Multi-grade oils have two ratings such as 10W-30.  The W stands for winter.  Thanks to the VI improver the oil flows like 10 grade oil at winter temperatures and 30 grade oil at summer temperatures.  It is the VI improver that makes the multi-grade oil.

But heat causes the VI improvers to break down.  As it does it becomes the oil becomes thinner.  When it becomes too thin the oil stops protecting causing excessive wear.

A lot of people think the only reason to change oil is because it gets dirty but that isn't true.  As the VI improver breaks down it also gets too thin.

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