cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
     
Highlighted
Participant ○○○

Paper on likely virus exposure/different gatherings

https://www.erinbromage.com/post/the-risks-know-them-avoid-them

I found this article interesting, mathematically illustrating risk exposure based on other coronaviruses.  Really I liked it because it confirmed how I was already thinking :-) One of my pet peeves has been my county closing the beaches (N. CA) These beaches are in normal times never at all crowded. In normal times it is unlikely to be within 6 yards of anyone let alone 6 feet. And the wind is usually blowing 10-15 MPH. Not much chance of exposure at these beaches to be a problem. On the other hand prolonged stays in confined areas pose the most likelihood of spreading the virus. This is just common sense for most people, and the basis for the idea social distancing, even if the mandated particulars  have its faults. 

 

7 Replies
Highlighted
Frequent Contributor

Re: Paper on likely virus exposure/different gatherings

According to what you posted, maybe folks should wear nose plugs?

"A Cough: A single cough releases about 3,000 droplets and droplets travels at 50 miles per hour. Most droplets are large, and fall quickly (gravity), but many do stay in the air and can travel across a room in a few seconds.

A Sneeze: A single sneeze releases about 30,000 droplets, with droplets traveling at up to 200 miles per hour. Most droplets are small and travel great distances (easily across a room).

If a person is infected, the droplets in a single cough or sneeze may contain as many as 200,000,000 (two hundred million) virus particles which can all be dispersed into the environment around them."

From this I cannot imagine being anywhere, inside any building, no mater how large and roomy, if someone sneezes! 30,000 droplets moving 200 miles an hour? Sneezing should be outlawed and people made to wear nose plugs, except home alone, and then their home quarantined.

Noses now seem deleterious. This is just terrible!

0 Kudos
Highlighted
Contributor ○

Re: Paper on likely virus exposure/different gatherings

They have repeated over and over (at least around here) the a mask doesn't really protect you.  What it does is protect those around you.  The mask you wear stops most of those droplets.

 

0 Kudos
Highlighted
Participant ○○○

Re: Paper on likely virus exposure/different gatherings

@FatKat I think the answer is for everyone to wear a diving helmet with rebreathing apparatus. :-)

@Mustang I agree masks can help if they are good quality and fit correctly. I see a lot of loose fitting masks and also the masks with the valves do little to contain one's exhaust. Bandanas are pretty useless as well. I do think a good N95 can protect from others.

 

0 Kudos
Highlighted
Participant ○

Re: Paper on likely virus exposure/different gatherings


@Mustang wrote:

They have repeated over and over (at least around here) the a mask doesn't really protect you.  What it does is protect those around you.  The mask you wear stops most of those droplets.

 


I've also seen that statement and  it is inaccurate.  "Masks only protect others from you."   Think about that statement... so they're saying doctors and nurses have been wearing masks all these years to protect patients from the doctor and nurses.  Does that make  sense to you? Reality: Masks protect both sides from both sides...  period.

0 Kudos
Highlighted
Frequent Contributor

Re: Paper on likely virus exposure/different gatherings


@archer wrote:

@FatKat I think the answer is for everyone to wear a diving helmet with rebreathing apparatus. :-)

@Mustang I agree masks can help if they are good quality and fit correctly. I see a lot of loose fitting masks and also the masks with the valves do little to contain one's exhaust. Bandanas are pretty useless as well. I do think a good N95 can protect from others.

 


Many Asians wore asks before the coronavirus. I think they are very smart, caring more about health than looks. Hard to believe the reasons some hod for not wearing them. " perhaps greater protection for the people around them. The virus seems to spread “when germ-containing droplets make it into a person’s mouth, nose, or eyes,” and it’s true that “masks stop people from spreading their own droplets.” If everyone wears a mask — including those who are asymptomatic but may still be carrying the virus — it could help halt the spread of Covid-19"..."For unmasked protesters like the ones in Michigan, “There’s an assumption of a kind of invincibility that is tied to this idea of masculinity," From Vox

https://youtu.be/bBBRl7bUkf4

Here are a few reasons why all Chinese are wearing masks during this current coronavirus pandemic. Also a few facts about COVID-19 that I did not find on CDC...
0 Kudos
Highlighted
Participant ○○○

Re: Paper on likely virus exposure/different gatherings

Prior to Covid, I think masks being popular among Asians  has mostly been due to air pollution. 

@royal4 Good point about the Drs. wearing masks. I think for the past few decades the idea was mutual protection but initially, probably until HIV dangers from blood contact, Drs wore masks mostly to maintain a sterile environment for the patients, to prevent infections. 

0 Kudos
Highlighted
Contributor ○

Re: Paper on likely virus exposure/different gatherings


@royal4 wrote:

@Mustang wrote:

They have repeated over and over (at least around here) the a mask doesn't really protect you.  What it does is protect those around you.  The mask you wear stops most of those droplets.

 


I've also seen that statement and  it is inaccurate.  "Masks only protect others from you."   Think about that statement... so they're saying doctors and nurses have been wearing masks all these years to protect patients from the doctor and nurses.  Does that make  sense to you? Reality: Masks protect both sides from both sides...  period.


Yes some masks do.  And those in the medical profession are buying up all of those.  I really doubt the designer masks that a lot of people are buying provide much protection to the wearer.

0 Kudos
Announcements

Morningstar is here to help you respond to the Coronavirus crisis.