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How do the literati/intelligensia find their soul mates? Here are a couple of books showcasing personal/lonely hearts ads found in the New York Review of Books and the London Review of Books.  FUNNY! NYRB = Lonely in Baltimore and LRB=They Call Me Naughty Lola

Tall, leggy redhead new to Chicago seeks men of wit, wisdom and warmth. Former academic, bored with paradigm shifts, interested in passionate gifts. I hate mimes, devoted to the Saturday Times puzzle, and (just between you and I) react strongly to poor grammar. I’m very particular about thread count, and I’m drawn to hopeful men who remind me of my favorite martini—straight up, with a twist and a little dirty.  

https://www.amazon.com/Lonely-Baltimore-Personal-Raymond-Shapiro/dp/0394714652/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=l...

"Lonely? A yearning heart? Tell it to someone who gives a **bleep**. Out there/over here U.S. academic woman, unsentimental but strong like an ox. Can break hearts as well as snap chicken necks. Would like to meet weak, inconsolable man who knows when he’s beat (that’s you, fella). https://www.amazon.com/They-Call-Me-Naughty-Lola/dp/1416540296/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=they+call+me+naug...

P.S. An Internet censor changed the word "da_n" above to "bleep." Next thing you know, they'll censor out "pool table"  and the like.   :^)

 

 

 

AKA recoveringdprof and rubirosa.
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After all these years in California (45+) I finally got around to reading a Steinbeck and that was East of Eden. What a wonderful read although at times I wanted to scream out loud at the lead character.  Another favorite is A Gentleman in Moscow by ....name escapes me.  I still laugh aloud at one of the lines early in Chapter 1 when the “gentleman” is being interrogated by the authorities and is asked why he returned to Moscow and he replies “I missed the weather”. 

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Excellent Article in The Atlantic .......Why I hope to Die at 75 by Ezekiel Emanual MD.

 

Gabe

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"Since the 1990s, I have actively opposed legalizing euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide." Ezekiel Emanual

He lost me there. Interesting though. 

The article I think, is in the October 2014 issue. 

 

 

 

AKA recoveringdprof and rubirosa.
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". . . asked why he returned to Moscow and he replies “I missed the weather”.  anatfizz1

I love those pithy comebacks --

From the film, THE FIRM --

ABBEY: SO WHY ARE YOU DIVORCED?

GENE HACKMAN: MY WIFE UNDERSTOOD ME. 

AKA recoveringdprof and rubirosa.
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I forget where I read praise of Manchester's three-volume bio of William Churchill, THE LAST LION.  Might have been Gore Vidal.  Anyway, I happened to stumble across Vol I in the bargain bin of a local used book store.    Everyone knows about WC and WWII, but I wanted to learn about his early life.   I had intended to read maybe the first 200 or 300 pp and then chuck the book.   But it turned out to be so fascinating I was "unable to put it down."   The book begins with the best discourse on Victorian and Edwardian England I have ever read as an introduction, and then on to Winston.  He adored his parents but they neglected him terribly.  (Passages on sexual hypocrisy of the upper classes -- his mother must have "slept" with half the members of parliament.   Father had a terrible, wasting death from syphilis).  In school Winston was a brilliant but incorrigible little rebel -- a brat who didn't show a bit of promise until he was accepted into the cavalry and created direction in his life, excelling at polo and markmanship, reading seriously and publishing news articles about India.    (Not the first, I dare say, who "grew up" in the military.)

Interesting how entitled he thought himself to be. When he went to the trenches in WWI he brought alone cases of wine and a portable bathtub and wore silk underwear.  Even in his 20s he "worked" the system to go where ever he wanted to be.  In India as a young officer,  it was too backwater for his ambition so he parlayed himself to go to Africa (over Kitchener's objections) to take plart in the colonial war of the Upper Nile.  His book THE RIVER WAR gained him his first taste of fame as he excelled as a writer and orator.    Major blunder of his -- he almost single-handedly drove Turkey to be allied with Germany in WWI.  Manchester opines Gallipoli blunder was not Winston's fault; it was a brilliant plan ruined by the timidity of Brit generals.  But Winston took the blame.   (Hindenburg wrote, "The British soldiers were lions led by donkeys.")    .... and on and on.

I recommend it to anyone interested in history.

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Sadly, W.Manchester past away before he finished Volume 3.

I agree Vol. 1 had a superb recitation of late Victorian and Edwardian England.

I still remember him quoting W.C. when W.C. was SCATHINGLY describing  the Nit-Wit Admiral who arrived from London at Gallipoli[ sp ] and stopped the Naval Assault just when it was succeeding, " He came, He saw, He capitulated ! "

Another example of a superb review of late Victorian and Edwardian England, is Barbara Tuchman's prequel to her masterpiece, The Guns of August.

 

signed,

 

Nofriends1

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The Last Lion is a great read.  Read vols. 1 and 2 in the 90's. Was pleasantly surprised when vol. 3 came out after Manchester's death.  Was reading either vol. 1 or 2 when Iraq invaded Kuwait.  Was amazed at the similarities in Iraq's justification for its invasion and those of Nazi Germany on invading its neighbors.  History truly repeats itself.  Was unaware that Churchill's mother was American until I read vol. 1.  The weekend escapades of the British aristocrats were quite scandalous to say the least.  Now, if I can just get the mental impressions of Churchill frolicking in the tub in the wee hours of the morning while he dictated his speeches to his staff out of my mind....Favorite Churchill story/quote.....Dinner guest to Churchill: "Sir, you are drunk."  Churchill: "And you are ugly. But, in the morning, I shall be sober." 

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@Kudzu wrote:

.Dinner guest to Churchill: "Sir, you are drunk."  Churchill: "And you are ugly. But, in the morning, I shall be sober." 


Very funny!  As a former English teacher, my favorite Churchillism is his reply to a woman who wrote to him correcting his grammar, pointing out that a sentence in his History of the English Speaking People included a sentence that ended with a preposition.  Churchill's reply: "Madam, ending a sentence with a preposition is something up with which I will not put."

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Dinner guest to Churchill: "Sir, you are drunk." Churchill: "And you are ugly. But, in the morning, I shall be sober."


Do not look up dinner guest Bessie Braddock or you will be tempted to excuse Churchill.
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EVELYN WAUGH ON CHURCHILL'S SORRY SON, RANDOLPH

Evelyn Waugh, on hearing that scallawag Randolph Churchill's benign lung tumor had been successfully removed, drolled, "The surgeons have removed the only part of Randolph that was not malignant."

AKA recoveringdprof and rubirosa.
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The Forgotten 500 about WW2 rescue of American pilots downed over Yugoslavia. Looking to get R.I.P. GOP soon.

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It's great to see this book thread so active, I love to see what others are reading, and, of course, get book ideas.  I'm a big reader, and I'm always on the lookout for suggestions.  For whatever reason, book discussion threads on the old forum seemed unable to gain much traction.  So, a completely random assortment of books I've read recently and enjoyed:

THE GIFTED SCHOOL by Bruce Holsinger.  A charter type school for exceptional children is to start.  This fiction book follows four families whom all have "exceptional" children, and follows the various efforts to get their children into this great new school.  It was actually a little unsettling to read in spots because I could easily see this as reality.  And of course the book is timely, considering the people that got caught in the recent college admissions scandal.  A good read.

SELLING 'EM BY THE SACK: White Castle and the Creation of American Food, by David Gerard Hogan.  Title sums up the theme of the book, published in 1997.  A slim volume that reads easily and proved to be a whole lot more interesting than I had anticipated.  Glad I read it.

VESSEL by Lisa A. Nichols.  Science fiction novel, one survivor returns from a space mission, with no recollection of what happened to the other crew members.  I don't read much sci-fi, so I don't have much to compare it to, but it held my interest. I thought the author did a great job with the storyline, some unexpected twists that made it fun to read.

THE LION IN THE LIVING ROOM: How House Cats Tamed Us and Took Over the World, by Abigale Tucker (2016).  If you like cats, this is a very good book.  

THE HALF HAS NEVER BEEN TOLD: Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism, by Edward E. Baptist (2014).  A self-explanatory title, and a fresh and unsettling look at "that peculiar institution".  I've read several books on slavery, and plantation life, but this book really extended my knowledge.  Recommended highly.

MILK OF PARADISE: A History of Opium, by Lucy Inglis (2019).  A look at opium and derivatives from ancient times up to the present.  Eye-opening, and very timely, considering the opioid crisis currently underway.

Like I said, a random assortment.  I read whatever catches my eye, and I like to have a good fiction and nonfiction book going at the same time.  I'm retired and have plenty of time to read (although I still can't get to all the books that I want to!).  

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John Grisham's new thriller, THE GUARDIANS comes out day after tomorrow. Here's the publisher's spiel on it. 

"In the small Florida town of Seabrook, a young lawyer named Keith Russo was shot dead at his desk as he worked late one night. The killer left no clues. There were no witnesses, no one with a motive. But the police soon came to suspect Quincy Miller, a young black man who was once a client of Russo’s. 

"Quincy was tried, convicted, and sent to prison for life. For twenty-two years he languished in prison, maintaining his innocence.  But no one was listening.  He had no lawyer, no advocate on the outside. In desperation, he writes a letter to Guardian Ministries, a small nonprofit run by Cullen Post, a lawyer who is also an Episcopal minister.

"Guardian accepts only a few innocence cases at a time.  Cullen Post travels the country fighting wrongful convictions and taking on clients forgotten by the system. With Quincy Miller, though, he gets far more than he bargained for. Powerful, ruthless people murdered Keith Russo, and they do not want Quincy Miller exonerated.

"They killed one lawyer twenty-two years ago, and they will kill another without a second thought."

AKA recoveringdprof and rubirosa.
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Today I finished Thomas Block's CAPTAIN, a thrilling 10-hour scream-all-the-way flight from Rome to New York. It was recommended by my son, himself an MD-11 Captain. Block was an airline pilot for 36 years, and he's best known as a former contributing editor to FLYING  and to PLANE & PILOT magazines , as well as CESSNA FLYER and PIPER FLYER. In addition he has four or five other books. His MAYDAY was made into a movie. In retirement, he and his wife train and compete with horses. It's a perfect beach read.

Not recommended for scaredy-cats.

AKA recoveringdprof and rubirosa.
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I'm having a little trouble getting into John Grisham's THE GUARDIANS. Cannot quite figure why, but don't much look forward to  picking it up. It's a bit too pedestrian. Doesn't really sound too much like Grisham. But I'm just half way through. I expect it to pick back up. 

AKA recoveringdprof and rubirosa.
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I don't read as many horror books as I used to, but I still pick one up from time to time.  Just finished "The Twisted Ones" by T. Kingfisher, and I thought it was exceptional, enjoyed it tremendously.  I was not previously aware of the author, but I ran across this book synopsis somewhere, maybe Goodreads, and requested it from the public library.  I don't like to discuss plots when it comes to the fiction books, I'm always afraid of giving out a spoiler or otherwise blabbing too many details.  

It took a little while for the spooky stuff to kick into high gear, but the story was interesting from the very beginning, and there were enough strange/unsettling incidents early on to set the stage and whet the appetite.  I also liked the author's voice, she has a way with words and can turn a phrase, I found myself smiling or otherwise admiring her wordcraft quite a bit.  Of course, most of the smiling was in the early stages of the story, before things get otherworldly (is that even a word?).  Anyway, if you are looking for something a little different in the horror genre, give this one a try.  

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I'm interested in the changes that are going to take place as a result of 5G, AI, Big Data, Cloud Computing, and the Baby Booker Die Off.  Here's what I'm reading

Required Reading for Tomorrow's Entrepreneur;
1. The Accidental Super Power by Peter Zeihan: https://amzn.to/2IJ8XLv
2. The Big Nine by Amy Webb: https://amzn.to/2MwEEc0
3. Supercharge Your Real Estate Sales by Kerry: https://amzn.to/2phxrEo
4. Digital Transformation, Survive and Thrive in an Era of Mass Extinction by Thomas M Siebel: https://amzn.to/2oxJjm0

I'm in real estate development:  https://youtu.be/z7v_KIWyCNI

 

Kerry J Grinkmeyer
BestofUS.kg@gmail.com
What are the disruptive trends in Real estate?, How technology is disrupting the real estate industry. What are the most disruptive technologies? Which indus...
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Kerry, what a coincidence.........I am reading The Accidental Superpower now. I would dispute some of his stats but small beer in the greater scheme of the book. Appreciate his sense of humour. The Emperor of All Maladies and Quartered Safe Out Here both very good reads about very different topics.

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Reading George Will's latest, The Conservative Sensibility.  Reading a thick book by George Will is probably up there with watching paint dry, but his chapter on "Culture and Opportunity" is definitely worthwhile.  I surmise his remarks will strike a chord with a group on an investing forum.  You may even want to skip the other chapters.

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