cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
     
Highlighted
Contributor ○○○

Re: Books you're reading

@fpajerskiI read "The Pioneers" by David McCollough a couple months ago, and it was very good indeed.  Excellent recommendation.

0 Kudos
Highlighted
Explorer ○○

Re: Books you're reading

Nine Days: A Novel by Minerva Koenig

Minerva Koenig is a brand new crime fiction writer out of Austin, TX. She’s most welcome. A quick check at her live traffic feed @ minervakoenig.com shows how rapidly readers in Texas and around the world are taking to her.

Hits from Killeen TX, 2 minutes ago; Baytown, 46 minutes ago; Austin 23 minutes ago. Then hits from Finland 27 seconds ago; Nigeria 1 second ago; Spain 9 seconds ago. And on through the scheme.

She’s becoming an instant celeb.

Why? Because, IMO, she’s invented the unlikeliest of female protagonists. Julia Kalas is a gun-runner’s horny widow who’s on the run from assassins. She’s no angel. She’s hiding out in Azula, a dying Texas hill country backwater. Did I say she’s an unlikely heroine? Yes. She’s far from perfect — short, plump, brassy. A regular weight lifter at the gym. Easily annoyed. Plenty of attitude. She doesn’t really give a hoot. Not into make-up and hair spray. Whip smart. Rude and mouthy. Still, she attracts her fair share of men.

The rest of the cast is just as unlikely — a black cafe owner, a lesbian beauty operator, a Jewish merchant, an Amazonian police chief, a prizefighter, a Mexican saloon keeper, a psychology student and a bitchy hotel operator. Plenty of characters who coulda done it. It’s not easy to guess who.

P.S. There are two other books titled “Nine Days.” You want the one by Minerva Koenig.

AKA recoveringdprof and rubirosa.
0 Kudos
Highlighted
Explorer ○○

Re: Books you're reading

And here's Minerva's last book (2016) which I've just begun to read ---  https://www.nyjournalofbooks.com/book-review/south-nowhere

AKA recoveringdprof and rubirosa.
0 Kudos
Highlighted
Contributor ○○○

Re: Books you're reading

@rubirosa:  Thanks for the post, I've made a note in my spiral notebook and I'll give that one a shot as soon as I work my way through my current stack of library books.  Sounds really good.  

I'm sure that this book is not similar, but for some reason, probably the female lead you described, I thought of a book that I read a while back that I really, really liked.  "An Easy Death" by Charlaine Harris.  If I had not already read her "Midnight" and "Sookie Stackhouse" series, I would not have given this book a second glance.  The setting is an alternate fantasy sort of thing, hard to describe, but I normally don't like anything in the alternate reality universe.  It's a stand-alone book, and apparently the first in a new series, since the number "1" is printed on the spine.  I sure hope so.  The book does wind up, it does not leave you hanging, but at the same time it looks wide open for a series.  

But getting back to your post, I am really intrigued and am looking forward to reading it.  Thanks again for the recommendation.

0 Kudos
Highlighted
Contributor ○○○

Re: Books you're reading

To follow up on my mention of "Saudi America" by Bethany McLain (2018), I've now read the book and it was even more interesting and informative than I had hoped.  It is in the paperback format, about 3/4 the size of a hardback, and is only 138 pages long.  I had mentioned that if it was fiction it would probably be referred to as a novella.  This from the back of the book: "Columbia Global Reports is a publishing imprint from Columbia University that commissions authors to do on-site reporting around the globe on a wide range of issues.  The resulting novella-length books offer new ways to look at and understand the world that can be read in a few hours.  Most readers are curious and busy.  Our books are for them."  They go on to list six additional titles in their series.  One of them I've seen recommended more than once, is "The Curse of Bigness:  Anti-trust in the New Guilded Age" by Tim Wu.  But back to Ms. McLean's book.  For anyone interested in the new dynamics of the oil and gas industry, unless you are already an expert, this is probably a must-read.

0 Kudos
Highlighted
Explorer ○○○

Re: Books you're reading

The Conceptual Foundations of Investing by Bradford Cornell, Shaun Cornell and Andrew Cornell, Wiley 2018.

0 Kudos
Highlighted
Explorer ○○

Re: Books you're reading

THE MONKEY WRENCH GANG and  HAYDUKE LIVES

It’s been almost fifty years since Edward Abbey’s MONKEY WRENCH was published, and some twenty-five years since release of its sequel, HAYDUKE. Neither has ever been out of print, and they both still hold up well. Still funny. Still irreverent. Still romantic. Still poetic.  

The books follow the adventures of four eco-crusaders – ex-Green Beret George Hayduke, rugged individualist and authority-hater; ‘Seldom Seen’ Smith, a Jack Mormon wilderness guide and neo-luddite; Doc Sarvis, a wealthy, aging surgeon; and Bonnie, his much younger, very hip lover, as they wage relentless guerrilla warfare against development and technology in general, and dam and highway builders, loggers, strip miners, etc., in particular.

If you’re looking for a warm and pleasant read or re-read, Edward Abbey can be a good choice. He’s all about the environment, the healing and rejuvenating powers of nature, escaping civilization, breathing pure air, sleeping well, etc. If you sometimes feel that need, Abbey can take you there.

P.S. MONKEY WRENCH spawned such eco-defense organizations as Greenpeace, Earth First, and The Earth Liberation Front.

AKA recoveringdprof and rubirosa.
0 Kudos
Highlighted
Contributor ○○○

Re: Books you're reading

@rubirosaWhen I retired in 2011 and moved back to Delaware, I retrieved the books that I had stored with my mom in Georgia.  Most of the books made it Delaware just fine, but one box was engulfed and devoured in the maws of the Philadelphia postal system.  When I was finally able to reassemble my library, I realized that "The Monkey Wrench Gang" was among the missing.  That was replaced in short order.  I first bought it when it came out in paperback, and even all those years ago, I had the sense that this was a special book.  A true classic, and thanks for bringing it up, reading it again sounds like a capital idea!

0 Kudos
Highlighted
Frequent Contributor

Re: Books you're reading

Nice thread.

Recently finished Elisha Waldman's "This Narrow Space"-- a physician's view of Israeli/Arab interactions at Haddasah Hospital.

Also strongly recommend "Factfulness," in light of all the BS used as "evidence" of this, that, or some other thing.

Bob 

0 Kudos
Highlighted
Participant ○

Re: Books you're reading

_Everything Trump Touches Dies_, by conservative Republican strategist Rick Scott.  Eye opening, and funny, too

0 Kudos
Highlighted
Frequent Contributor

Re: Books you're reading

 

mlott..a question really important question.

If you have the good fortune of having read so much, why do you write posts without using paragraphs, such as found within other current threads?

Curious minds are asking.:-)

R48

 

0 Kudos
Highlighted
Follower ○○

Re: Books you're reading

At the moment I am reading a science fiction novel "Cat's Cradle" written by Kurt Vonnegut. And I'm planning to keep reading his books, "Breakfast of Champions" and "Mother Night" at least.

Highlighted
Explorer ○○

Re: Books you're reading

THE ORCHARD KEEPER by Cormac McCarthy

This isn’t my favorite McCarthy novel but it’s still Cormac McCarthy -- beautifully descriptive, artful,

lyrical, almost poetic in its prose. It was his debut novel, mid-sixties. It’s set in the Smokey Mountains, 1930s.

It’s a dark story, bleak and a bit jumpy and disconnected. Difficult to follow at times. A little overwritten at times.

The Kindle dictionaries cannot carry all the words in his head.

It’s not SUTTREE or THE ROAD. But it IS Cormac McCarthy. That’s enough. One of our all-time greats.

AKA recoveringdprof and rubirosa.
0 Kudos
Highlighted
Contributor ○

Re: Books you're reading

Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Pirsig. Richard Halliburton's Book of Marvels.

0 Kudos
Highlighted
Contributor ○○○

Re: Books you're reading

 

@R48, it just never occurred to me that posting on an internet forum anyone would care whether or not paragraphs were used.  Now that I think about it, I can see that using paragraph breaks could make things easier to read.  I should have plenty of leftover paragraph breaks, so I'll start using them.

0 Kudos
Highlighted
Explorer ○

Re: Books you're reading

I've started binge reading "Terry and the Pirates" comic strips. I'm up to 1936. 

Terry and Pat just received a mission to protect secrets of the long ranged Pan American Clipper from an "unnamed foreign nation" a year before the Sino-Japanese war broke out -- I found the timing of that fun.

Beautiful women are at the root of most of their problems. There's a lesson there.

0 Kudos
Highlighted
Explorer ○○

Re: Books you're reading

Sounds interesting Vahog83.

Is this where you obtained the strips?  

https://www.amazon.com/s?k=Terry+and+the+Pirates+comic+strip&ref=nb_sb_noss_2

Thanks

AKA recoveringdprof and rubirosa.
0 Kudos
Highlighted
Frequent Contributor

Re: Books you're reading

Just finished reading "Woke" by Titania McGrath.  It's excellent.

617b5Kdar3L.jpg

Quotes:

The patriarchy is ancient.  Our planet has existed for roughly four and a half billion years of male tyranny.  What we really need is a system of reparations.  The optimal solution would be to invert the current social order. Women should be paid twice as much as their male counterparts to make up for the injustices of history.

It isn't enough for us to have a female Prime Minister, female First Minister of Scotland, and female Head of State. These are just tokenistic appointments intended to give the impression of equality.  It's a trick.

If all children were obese, then no one would ever be bullied for being fat.  So if you are serious about combating fat-shaming, you have a responsibility to overfeed your kids.

Let's be very clear about this.  Any form of segregation of the sexes, in sports, in schools, in toilet facilities - anywhere at all - is a reprehensible form of gender apartheid.  Except when it comes to mosques, in which case it's empowering.

And say what you will about ISIS, but at least they're not Islamophobic.

We are living through a dangerous time in British history.  Acid attacks, knife crime, female genital mutilation, grooming gangs, terrorism; all of these things are now commonplace thanks to the referendum that resulted in a decision to leave the European Union.

0 Kudos
Highlighted
Explorer ○

Re: Books you're reading

Rubirosa,

I can't remember exactly where we got them. They've sat on the shelf a couple of years before I just got around to them. I got the "Complete" versions which your link shows. Seeing the prices today, I'm pretty confident I got them on some clearance deal!

Realize they can get pretty campy at times (and you're not entirely sure they're trying to be campy!) but I'm two years into it, and its interesting to see them become a little bit more sophisticated.

I'm sure some folks these days would (literally) horrified at the Chinese servant, but I find him to be the best character in the stories ("Must save Amelican fliends again, make all Hotsy-Dandy!").

0 Kudos
Highlighted
Frequent Contributor

Re: Books you're reading


@mlott1 wrote:

 

@R48, it just never occurred to me that posting on an internet forum anyone would care whether or not paragraphs were used.  Now that I think about it, I can see that using paragraph breaks could make things easier to read.  I should have plenty of leftover paragraph breaks, so I'll start using them.


Sounds like an "ah ha" moment...glad to have helped.

FYI you made a post recently I skipped reading because of the torture of "no paragraphs."...  so I thought I would mention it to you.

To actually go to the extreme, I find posts that make every sentence a paragraph are the easiest to read!! 

I sometimes use that trick in shorter posts, such as this one.

Good day.

R48, 19,000+ posts later.

 

0 Kudos
Announcements

Morningstar is here to help you respond to the Coronavirus crisis.