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Re: What to do now

 

Great post, mlott !   I remember it well -- but you forgot to mention the man who inspired me to take investing seriously.  I'm talking about the sainted gentleman Marty Zweig.  In the attached clip of an historic Wall Street Week episode, Marty correctly calls the October 1987 crash at the 6:45 minute point.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2MyToTwag34

The episode was important to me because I later noticed the crash was heralded by early-tremors in the market the week before and that people who heeded technical warnings were able by bypass the carnage.   I was a young investor then who knew nothing about trading and my life savings lost 30% the next week.  I never forgot it.  My best friend from college, who was heavily into options was wiped out.  He lost a small fortune that Monday and has never recovered.

First 10 minutes of Wall Street Week episode from Friday October 16, 1987 just prior to the market crash on black Monday. Hosted by Louis Rukeyser, guests in...
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Re: What to do now


@judger wrote:

@retiredat48 wrote:

@FD1001 wrote:

@

 


 

 

T/A just makes it easier for me to trade, it's just a mechanical system but I also think Wall St algos follow these "stupid" patterns. Why 200 days MA(moving average) is used more than 256 days MA?


Long ago, there was a scholar-type study that did an in-depth review of using moving averages.  The author  concluded two things:  Moving averages do work...and, that his iterative computer analysis showed that 209 days was the optimal.

I submit this was rounded to 200, for ease of application and construct.  One of the early no-load mutual fund reports used 200 day MAs...and it was useful.

Of course, going way back, one had to do MAs manually, on the backs of envelopes, for each fund.  But that's like saying we walked 3 miles in snow to get to school!

Bonus day: For those not familiar with using Moving Averages, and successful investing, here is a video showing historical returns: (I am not the Floridian, KDenniger, presenting the video)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bN9WUIXaRr4

Enjoy...

R48

 


Maybe some of you remember the MF days when telephone switch funds were created (1970's???). And then there was Dick Fabian with the Fabian Telephone Switch Fund Newsletter. He based his strategy on the 200 day MA!!! Heard him talk once. I followed and paid for his newsletters for years. His tapes and recommended books were like fireside chats. Bought his newsletter for decades! Loved the guy.

I even bought into the guy who left that newsletter to be an investment advisor based on Fabian's MA strategy. Took me something like the 1990's to fairly recently to write off the loses in all of our accounts that we entrusted to him.

I believe that computers and quant's killed their MA approach. But his kid who took over the newsletter introduced me to "ETF's".   :-((( 

PS: Then do you remember the Friday night PBS Louis Rukeyser investment evening investment show? In my investment infancy I just LOVED Lou!!!! 


Yes, I clearly remember those days, newsletters and shows.

Believe it or not, there was a time you could buy open ended mutual funds at the previous days closing price.  Took advantage of this a lot (no load funds).  SEC finally stopped the practice.

Seems most Moving Average strategies were based on 200 days.

R48

 

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Re: What to do now


@richardsok wrote:

 

Great post, mlott !   I remember it well -- but you forgot to mention the man who inspired me to take investing seriously.  I'm talking about the sainted gentleman Marty Zweig.  In the attached clip of an historic Wall Street Week episode, Marty correctly calls the October 1987 crash at the 6:45 minute point.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2MyToTwag34

The episode was important to me because I later noticed the crash was heralded by early-tremors in the market the week before and that people who heeded technical warnings were able by bypass the carnage.   I was a young investor then who knew nothing about trading and my life savings lost 30% the next week.  I never forgot it.  My best friend from college, who was heavily into options was wiped out.  He lost a small fortune that Monday and has never recovered.


Yes, I recall.

Zweig was more "technically based", a no no those days.

WSW also had a guru that was ALWAYS WRONG...name was Carter Randall.  He let his emotions get in the way at market tops and bottoms.  I used Carter as a contrarian indicator.

BTW I see I finally have something in common with Rukeyser, after all these years of investing:  Due COVID, I now have long, grey hair on sides.  Spouse likes it!

R48

 

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Re: What to do now

Just listened to Consuelo Mack's weekly interview with Ed Hyman and he said one of Marty's claim to fame sayings was "Don't Fight the Fed".  This is one way to explain why the economy is down and the stock market continues to go up.

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Re: What to do now

and let's not forget the tech analysisand gail dudek.  i had a serious crush on her.  hotsytotsy, if i'm allowed to use that word these days.

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Re: What to do now

Adding on to my questions about using trailing stops (TS) as sell indicators, have any of you incorporated TS with Pyramiding Down (PD) strategies? After my first question above I was thinking that I could have used PD to get out of the likes of IOFIX, PIMIX, SEMMX as they started to lose value and to eventually end up with mostly MMF investments for what I thought were great dry powder investments and really were NOT - say selling using TS logic after every 1-2% loss. Notice that I carefully sidestepped using the term "cash equivalents".   :-)))

Remembering that I am NOT a buy-and-hold guy and getting deeper into what one does when he wishes to execute potentially very large sales due to whatever sell criteria he uses or maybe he is stuck holding large loses after failing to get out.

When selling large positions, what if you decide to sell it all? Many of the positions I have do not sell very well in large 5-6 digit amounts. How does one execute these? Just do it? Maybe there are times during the day when this works better. Break it into smaller sells? Sell over multiple days? One consideration here for the fairly large T Row Price MF positions I hold is that I probably do NOT want to sell any position totally since TRP has been rather sticky about getting back into many of its MF's if you are a "new" buyer at least at our broker's site.

Now regarding the situation where one finds himself with significant loses in various securities and trying to follow the stark warnings "TO NEVER  SELL" and "NEVER TRY TO CATCH FALLING KNIFES", what does one do with those securities where even hoped for dollar cost averaging and potentially large distribution percentages on these new purchases just do NOT seem feasible or prident? I saw one suggestion above that, I believe, R48 seemed to like. That appeared to be flee the "loser" and buy another depressed security with much better prospects. I did a bit of this recently when I figured that PIMIX with about a 10% loss probably would not regain its previous levels anywhere as fast or to the same levels as some low volatility stock ETF's I own with similar drawdowns. In another instance, I owned JMSIX that was down and a CEF or 2 that I should never had bought that were down and I just sold them and reinvested in PIMCO CEF's that have stunning distributions at the current price with IMHO much better chances at paying and recovering. Is this a good strategy in your opinions?

I would appreciate hearing your experiences, thoughts and approaches for these questions. Thank all three of you for this advanced investment strategies learning opportunity.   :-)))

 

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Re: What to do now


@sandman100 wrote:

@judger wrote:

So here I am with a big bunch of ETF's, CEF's and bond ETF's (IOFIX, SEMMX, PIMIX) with serious loses 
Warning. Following the advice espoused on this forum could be dangerous to your portfolio health.

 


Sandman, I sometimes have a poor memory of past actions, but was it you that I am still waiting on my post for an explanation about holding and even buying more of the CEF HIE that is down about 40%? This is one of those fabulous loses I refer to.   :-)))

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Re: What to do now


@mlott1 wrote:

Yup, I remember the Friday night "Wall Street Week" with Louis Rukeyser.  I was a young airman stationed in Northern California in the early 1980's, and just getting into investing.  It was a Friday night ritual to watch Rukeyser's show.  And I had also discovered The Nightly Business Report, a 30 minute show on PBS every evening, Monday through Friday.  Loved the two anchors, Suzy Gehrib and the late Paul Kangas (and his sign-off, 'wishing you the best of good buys'.  And then that new national newspaper, USA Today, with a whole section devoted to business and investing!  And Money magazine had already been out for a few years.  A veritable plethora of investing information!  How could it possibly get any better?  Ah yes, those were the days, my friend...


We had the same Friday ritual. I usually started work late every day and worked until whenever the last train got me home before about 9pm or so but I made sure I made Lou's show on Friday. Now that you mention him, I do recall Paul Kangas too, Liked him also. I might have been wrong, but "Kangas" reminded me of some of the Scandinavian names from where we were raised.

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Re: What to do now

@judger , it is risky to use trailing-stops generally for the reasons you have already mentioned. Basically, they take you out in the worst way - those stops turn into market orders and in a falling market that can be bad. They were terrible in flash-crashes where there were huge rebounds that followed.

I use them only for trading. For example, in the previous post that you quoted, I used 3% trailing-stops on a few things I bought in March selloff and decided that rebound for them was good enough already. Alternative would have been outright sell or limit-sell that may or may not trigger. 3% trailing stops were triggered on these within days.

If you have losses in some positions, you can realize those losses for tax purposes and swap into something similar, or consolidate. For example, all multisector bond funds fell, and I consolidated all of them into one.

YBB
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Re: What to do now


@yogibearbull wrote:

@judger , it is risky to use trailing-stops generally for the reasons you have already mentioned. Basically, they take you out in the worst way - those stops turn into market orders and in a falling market that can be bad. They were terrible in flash-crashes where there were huge rebounds that followed.

I use then only for trading. For example, in the previous post that you quoted, I used 3% trailing-stops on a few things I bought in March selloff and decided that rebound for them was good enough already. Alternative would have been outright sell or limit-sell that may or may not trigger. 3% trailing stops were triggered on these within days.

If you have losses in some positions, you can realize those losses for tax purposes and swap into something similar, or consolidate. For example, all multisector bond funds fell, and I consolidated all of them into one.


Yogi, I believe that we have had this cautionary discussion about TS  several times. I again emphasize that I do NOT place TS orders. I have a spreadsheet that calculates stop values and violations and I then decide whether to sell and I do indeed ALWAYS place limit order sells. Unfortunately, I let the YTD dip slip by me and failed to execute manual limit sells.

Also, unfortunately by far most of our investments are in tax-sheltered accounts and tax loss harvesting opportunities are minimal. I would be swapping to get out of previous poor choices and into better securities with currently very attractive distribution rates.

Thank you for your continued investment/research thoughts and suggestions.   :-)))

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Re: What to do now

@yogibearbull 

What multi-sector bond fund did you consolidate into?

I remember you were not pleased with PIMIX transparency and explanations of their foreign bond trades.

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Re: What to do now


@Sheryldell wrote:

@yogibearbull 

What multi-sector bond fund did you consolidate into?

I remember you were not pleased with PIMIX transparency and explanations of their foreign bond trades.


Institutional JMSIX, no-load/NTF at Schwab.

YBB
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Re: What to do now


@judger wrote:

Adding on to my questions about using trailing stops (TS) as sell indicators, have any of you incorporated TS with Pyramiding Down (PD) strategies?

R48 replies in bold:  I have never used Trailing Stops in investing.  (Note you couldn't do this with oef's).  Always concerned the market makers could/would simply drop prices to take out the "stops", then immediately rebound.  Also, I have not bought individual stocks in 50 years.

After my first question above I was thinking that I could have used PD to get out of the likes of IOFIX, PIMIX, SEMMX as they started to lose value and to eventually end up with mostly MMF investments for what I thought were great dry powder investments and really were NOT - say selling using TS logic after every 1-2% loss. Notice that I carefully sidestepped using the term "cash equivalents".   :-)))

This is precisely what I did.  Pyramid Down.

Regarding fixed income funds, I strategically made a decision to exit from many intermediate to long term bond funds.  Strategic decision...long story why.  I started in January. 

But then COVID changed the dynamics further.  Like, I viewed a very long term holding I had, a PIMCO Emerging Market Bond Fund, was quite at risk with a pandemic.  I started selling some in Feb.  Pyramid down kept me selling some more about every day or two.  It just kept dropping and dropping.  I finally reached exiting all of it(100%).

Note also this is the first time in my life I was mitigating stock fund losses in a correction/bear market time period, concurrent with exiting bond funds in a big way.

 

Remembering that I am NOT a buy-and-hold guy and getting deeper into what one does when he wishes to execute potentially very large sales due to whatever sell criteria he uses or maybe he is stuck holding large loses after failing to get out.

Caution.  A decline from a peak should not be confused with actual "losses".  Terminology is important.  Few bought their portfolio at a peak.  But capital preservation is key to me...that Buffett Rule about not losing money.  

I think I am now in an actual loss position in MLPs, albeit a small one.  I owned three C-corp MLPs a few years ago, like NTG and KYN.  (These hold like 33 individual MLPs.).  But when MLPs seemed to be lagging in performance, I sold the third c-corp, (at a gain) reducing holdings by 1/3.  Then with the Kinder Morgan fiasco, I sold out of KYN, using 200 day Moving Average controls, and Pyramid Down selling (even).  I kept NTG (was impressed the managers held zero KMI going into downturn of about 3 years ago).  But even though I got about 10% a year dividend yield (did not reinvest), from a total return standpoint, if I calculate it for each year, I am now likely to be in a negative position with NTG...but it is very small (<1% of portfolio.)  But this is an example of how I exited a strategic investment space, still held a big-time loser, but mitigated the impact greatly.

When selling large positions, what if you decide to sell it all? Many of the positions I have do not sell very well in large 5-6 digit amounts. How does one execute these? Just do it? Maybe there are times during the day when this works better. Break it into smaller sells? Sell over multiple days? One consideration here for the fairly large T Row Price MF positions I hold is that I probably do NOT want to sell any position totally since TRP has been rather sticky about getting back into many of its MF's if you are a "new" buyer at least at our broker's site.

I can't remember last time I ever sold out all at once of a large position.  I'm almost afraid to do this!  But since January onward, have been selling out of both bond and stock funds, with almost daily sitting in front of the TV, reacting a lot in last 20 minutes of market day (to 4 pm).  Posted a sale as early as  Jan due  "melt-up", and COVID19.  I had studied pandemics (and dirty nuclear bombs), as potential threats to markets, so the early start was lucky, or strategic...take your pick.  BTW I was nervous with selling large amounts that even Pyramid Down bucket selling suggested.

Now regarding the situation where one finds himself with significant loses in various securities and trying to follow the stark warnings "TO NEVER  SELL" and "NEVER TRY TO CATCH FALLING KNIFES", what does one do with those securities where even hoped for dollar cost averaging and potentially large distribution percentages on these new purchases just do NOT seem feasible or prident? I saw one suggestion above that, I believe, R48 seemed to like. That appeared to be flee the "loser" and buy another depressed security with much better prospects. I did a bit of this recently when I figured that PIMIX with about a 10% loss probably would not regain its previous levels anywhere as fast or to the same levels as some low volatility stock ETF's I own with similar drawdowns. In another instance, I owned JMSIX that was down and a CEF or 2 that I should never had bought that were down and I just sold them and reinvested in PIMCO CEF's that have stunning distributions at the current price with IMHO much better chances at paying and recovering. Is this a good strategy in your opinions?

Yes, I post about making same-day switches to change at any time (up or down markets) to something one views as a better investment.  

This bear market, I am strategically repositioning much more than usual.  BUT WHILE I HAVE BEEN  SELLING OUT OF SOMETHING, I AM HOLDING...WAITING...PATIENCE...TO TAKE NEW/DIFFERENT POSITIONS.  I allow this wait may be even a year or more long.  This could be a great opportunity lost, or not.  But as a retiree, I do not need huge (or any) gains from here.  Current stock strategy is to move away from international/europe/EM, and small caps... adding to  USA Large Cap...even super-large cap, and specialty sectors.  May even buy some individual stocks, versus an ETF or oef...such as if I ever re-enter Energy space, may be one or two stocks versus XLE.

 

I would appreciate hearing your experiences, thoughts and approaches for these questions. Thank all three of you for this advanced investment strategies learning opportunity.   :-)))

Glad to help.

R48 in bold above.

 


 

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Re: What to do now


@yogibearbull wrote:

@Sheryldell wrote:

@yogibearbull 

What multi-sector bond fund did you consolidate into?

I remember you were not pleased with PIMIX transparency and explanations of their foreign bond trades.


Institutional JMSIX, no-load/NTF at Schwab.


Have some, but not a lot. I am seeing around -10%. Does your buy show hope for the future, Yogi?   :-)))

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Re: What to do now

@yogibearbull 

What is the best site/resource to determine the yield of a bond OEF as well as a bond ETF ?

I know you have posted about this several times before. The SEC Yield is trailing for one month according to the M* note which explains the calculation. It is the SEC standard to compare fund yields but not really accurate?

Is there a place to find the real yield of distributions for OEF funds and ETFs or does one have to calculate it oneself?

ETFs generally have both SEC Yield and 12 month yield on M* quote page. I have not done my own calculation for an ETF as I have below for two bond OEFs, PIMIX and JMSIX.

For example, PIMIX shows a 4.00% SEC Yield, but the 0.055 monthly distribution X 12 / 11.12 closing price, 5/15/20,, is a yield of 5.93%.

JMSIX shows an SEC Yield of 6.63%, but the same above calculation gives a yield of 5.39 % using closing price of 8.67 and distribution of 0.039.

Where can this more accurate number for distribution yield be found, if anywhere? I understand the current price drops have affected this month's posted SEC numbers to a large degree, but nevertheless would like to know the best sites to go to for both of these figures.

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Re: What to do now


@judger wrote:

@sandman100 wrote:

@judger wrote:

So here I am with a big bunch of ETF's, CEF's and bond ETF's (IOFIX, SEMMX, PIMIX) with serious loses 
Warning. Following the advice espoused on this forum could be dangerous to your portfolio health.

 


Sandman, I sometimes have a poor memory of past actions, but was it you that I am still waiting on my post for an explanation about holding and even buying more of the CEF HIE that is down about 40%? This is one of those fabulous loses I refer to.   :-)))


Judger: That definitely wasn’t me. I never heard of it. Seems like you’ve been knocked for a loop investing in some of the dogs recommended here. As I said reading this forum is very dangerous, rife with poor advice. 

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Re: What to do now


@retiredat48 wrote:

@judger wrote:

Adding on to my questions about using trailing stops (TS) as sell indicators, have any of you incorporated TS with Pyramiding Down (PD) strategies?

R48 replies in bold:  I have never used Trailing Stops in investing.  (Note you couldn't do this with oef's).  Always concerned the market makers could/would simply drop prices to take out the "stops", then immediately rebound.  Also, I have not bought individual stocks in 50 years.

After my first question above I was thinking that I could have used PD to get out of the likes of IOFIX, PIMIX, SEMMX as they started to lose value and to eventually end up with mostly MMF investments for what I thought were great dry powder investments and really were NOT - say selling using TS logic after every 1-2% loss. Notice that I carefully sidestepped using the term "cash equivalents".   :-)))

This is precisely what I did.  Pyramid Down.

Regarding fixed income funds, I strategically made a decision to exit from many intermediate to long term bond funds.  Strategic decision...long story why.  I started in January. 

But then COVID changed the dynamics further.  Like, I viewed a very long term holding I had, a PIMCO Emerging Market Bond Fund, was quite at risk with a pandemic.  I started selling some in Feb.  Pyramid down kept me selling some more about every day or two.  It just kept dropping and dropping.  I finally reached exiting all of it(100%).

Note also this is the first time in my life I was mitigating stock fund losses in a correction/bear market time period, concurrent with exiting bond funds in a big way.

 

Remembering that I am NOT a buy-and-hold guy and getting deeper into what one does when he wishes to execute potentially very large sales due to whatever sell criteria he uses or maybe he is stuck holding large loses after failing to get out.

Caution.  A decline from a peak should not be confused with actual "losses".  Terminology is important.  Few bought their portfolio at a peak.  But capital preservation is key to me...that Buffett Rule about not losing money.  

I think I am now in an actual loss position in MLPs, albeit a small one.  I owned three C-corp MLPs a few years ago, like NTG and KYN.  (These hold like 33 individual MLPs.).  But when MLPs seemed to be lagging in performance, I sold the third c-corp, (at a gain) reducing holdings by 1/3.  Then with the Kinder Morgan fiasco, I sold out of KYN, using 200 day Moving Average controls, and Pyramid Down selling (even).  I kept NTG (was impressed the managers held zero KMI going into downturn of about 3 years ago).  But even though I got about 10% a year dividend yield (did not reinvest), from a total return standpoint, if I calculate it for each year, I am now likely to be in a negative position with NTG...but it is very small (<1% of portfolio.)  But this is an example of how I exited a strategic investment space, still held a big-time loser, but mitigated the impact greatly.

When selling large positions, what if you decide to sell it all? Many of the positions I have do not sell very well in large 5-6 digit amounts. How does one execute these? Just do it? Maybe there are times during the day when this works better. Break it into smaller sells? Sell over multiple days? One consideration here for the fairly large T Row Price MF positions I hold is that I probably do NOT want to sell any position totally since TRP has been rather sticky about getting back into many of its MF's if you are a "new" buyer at least at our broker's site.

I can't remember last time I ever sold out all at once of a large position.  I'm almost afraid to do this!  But since January onward, have been selling out of both bond and stock funds, with almost daily sitting in front of the TV, reacting a lot in last 20 minutes of market day (to 4 pm).  Posted a sale as early as  Jan due  "melt-up", and COVID19.  I had studied pandemics (and dirty nuclear bombs), as potential threats to markets, so the early start was lucky, or strategic...take your pick.  BTW I was nervous with selling large amounts that even Pyramid Down bucket selling suggested.

Now regarding the situation where one finds himself with significant loses in various securities and trying to follow the stark warnings "TO NEVER  SELL" and "NEVER TRY TO CATCH FALLING KNIFES", what does one do with those securities where even hoped for dollar cost averaging and potentially large distribution percentages on these new purchases just do NOT seem feasible or prident? I saw one suggestion above that, I believe, R48 seemed to like. That appeared to be flee the "loser" and buy another depressed security with much better prospects. I did a bit of this recently when I figured that PIMIX with about a 10% loss probably would not regain its previous levels anywhere as fast or to the same levels as some low volatility stock ETF's I own with similar drawdowns. In another instance, I owned JMSIX that was down and a CEF or 2 that I should never had bought that were down and I just sold them and reinvested in PIMCO CEF's that have stunning distributions at the current price with IMHO much better chances at paying and recovering. Is this a good strategy in your opinions?

Yes, I post about making same-day switches to change at any time (up or down markets) to something one views as a better investment.  

This bear market, I am strategically repositioning much more than usual.  BUT WHILE I HAVE BEEN  SELLING OUT OF SOMETHING, I AM HOLDING...WAITING...PATIENCE...TO TAKE NEW/DIFFERENT POSITIONS.  I allow this wait may be even a year or more long.  This could be a great opportunity lost, or not.  But as a retiree, I do not need huge (or any) gains from here.  Current stock strategy is to move away from international/europe/EM, and small caps... adding to  USA Large Cap...even super-large cap, and specialty sectors.  May even buy some individual stocks, versus an ETF or oef...such as if I ever re-enter Energy space, may be one or two stocks versus XLE.

 

I would appreciate hearing your experiences, thoughts and approaches for these questions. Thank all three of you for this advanced investment strategies learning opportunity.   :-)))

Glad to help.

R48 in bold above.

 


 


Seriously, do you think all that blah blah blah helped Judger. Melt up, melt down, wtf. The poor guy already took losses with crap multi sector bonds and CEFs. Now you’re telling him about MLPs and whatever else. 

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Re: What to do now

Very true, it applies to all discussions/advice here.  In fact, M* Guidelines spell it out well:

 

Remember, this is user-generated content
You'll find plenty of good advice here, but remember that your situation, configuration, or implementation may vary from that of the individual sharing a solution. Some advice you find here may even be wrong. Apply the same good judgment here that you would apply to information anywhere on the Internet.

 

Worth reminding us often. 

If we all practiced the six items listed there, this place would be so peaceful and joyful:D

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Re: What to do now

Sandman says: "Seriously, do you think all that blah blah blah helped Judger. Melt up, melt down, wtf. The poor guy already took losses with crap multi sector bonds and CEFs. Now you’re telling him about MLPs and whatever else."

Sandman, thank you very much for your cautions.

As to the above, I freely admit and have done so many times that I am NOT a "trader". This implies that since I do not buy-and-hold, do not asset  allocate and have responsibility for fairly large amounts across a fair number of family portfolios that I appreciate when others share what works for them. I have learned a lot from these forums and especially these 3 OP's here. This does not imply that I blindly accept or follow it.

Most know and value Yogi's suggestions/ideas/knowledge and I have learned much from him, especially regarding tools that I can use for research. I have seen R48's posts for many years on M* and I really appreciate him sharing based on pretty much supporting himself for decades via investing. BTW I had NEVER heard of the Pyramid up/down concepts AND I believe if I had, I could have saved large amounts in my multi sector bond disaster if I had applied the down approach.

Since I am not into bonds, I have been very impressed by the knowledge and numbers-based approach by FD. Even though a number seem to like to attack him, I for one greatly appreciate it when he shares thoughts, tickers and detailed statistics. This does not mean that I will become his bond disciple.

I have followed a limited number of M* forums of interest for years. I continue to grow that number as I delve, although sometimes rather unsuccessfully, into other investment areas that I have never been in. I must say that this particular thread and a few older ones by these OP's along with their continued participation have a refreshing approach. Instead of limited comments on limited topics, they attempt to transfer knowledge. If you or others find it "trivial" or strongly disagree please either refrain from suppressing the learning of some of us rather "ignorant" observers but go right ahead and post constructive views if you feel it useful or necessary.

As others have also said, "Beware (of free advice)". Please let us adults read and decide what we value and can use.    :-)))

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Re: What to do now

@judger  Some good thoughts and a very common sense approach.  I tend to approach the various comments, suggestions, strategies, etc. like I'm shopping in a supermarket.  I just take what I can use and leave the rest on the shelf.  Doesn't mean that an item isn't good, just that it's not right for me.  A good example is the R48 "Pyramid" approach.  It has obviously worked for him, and others have found it useful, but it is not a strategy that I am comfortable with.  So I leave it on the shelf.

One obvious benefit from this forum is the exposure to many different funds and stocks.  At the very least I find it interesting to see what others recommend, or are happy with holding for themselves.  And when you are in the market for a particular type of fund or stock, this is a great place to get suggestions.

 

 

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